Friday, May 31, 2013

Jam of the Day: Katy B - "What Love Is Made Of"


Love this rave-pop track from Katy B. No words on when her second record is coming out but it should be within the year.

Videos of the Week


For a short work week this sure felt like a long one. Let's jet into the weekend with these amazing videos:



This slamming club track gets a video that will make you testify.



This slithery Suede track gets a museum destroying video.



Slick rave-pop track from Katy B gets an equally slick video in the Fast & Furious vein.



Ridiculous track from Major Lazer gets a ridiculous/awesome video (NSFW).



Grainy, in-studio video from Glass Candy.



Baddass live clip from Prince.

Wednesday, May 29, 2013

Jam of the Day: Float Fall - "Someday"


Gorgeous and lonely pop song from Belgian duo Float Fall. The video is heartbreaking.


Album Review: Baths - Obsidian


Baths
Obsidian
Rating: Woof Daddy

From the album cover alone, you know that Bath's second album Obsidian is going to be a darker, more heavy affair than his warm, liquidy debut Cerulean. This record is not so much a startling leap than a culmination of what was already there to begin with. Cerulean alone displayed Will Wiesenfeld’s immense talent as a producer, and his ability to mix together fractured Brainfeeder beats along with glitchy electronics and marrying them to his own skewed pop sensibilities. While Cerulean was a brilliant debut, you always got the sense that Wiesenfeld was holding back, that somehow he was just testing the waters, waiting to see whether his sound could hold up. When he started writing the follow up to Cerulean, Wiesenfeld was felled by a bout of E. coli that left he practically debilitated for several weeks, and that period along with his recovery colors every corner of Obsidian, a fascinatingly dark, obsessive record about life and death, relationships, success and failure, everything a young person would obsess over in the face of a debilitating illness. Obsidian is Baths hitting on all cylinders, a definitive statement of purpose.

Musically, Obsidian is not too far off the mark from Cerulean. It is still an electronic record for the most part, however, it is more widescreen and enveloping and less insular than its brother, and is breathtakingly varied and more muscular. Wiesenfeld's voice, a haunting falsetto, was used sparingly on his debut, and often filtered, twisted, and manipulated into something different that took away from its naked purity. Here, Wiesenfeld's voice is prominent in almost every track, wisely kept unadorned for the most part, giving these tracks a more human feel.

Off the bat you know you are in for something different, emerging from a funeral beginning of backwards masked vocals, synth drones, and crackling fires, "Worsening" evolves into stuttering beats, gently plucked guitars, and piano stabs pushing through the gloom into a hazy daylight. Wiesenfeld enters almost confessional lyrics like "Where is God when you hate him most/When the mouths in the earth come to bite at my robes" a perfect encapsulation of when your body fails you and it feels like you are never going to be well again.



"Miasma Sky" further delves into his sickness and fears of mortality asking "Miasma Sky would you swallow me alive/Realize there is very little you can do for me." The bleakness of the lyrics is belied by the peppy electronics and bouncy beats.



Electronics take a backseat on the gorgeous, piano and string led track "Ironworks," which finds Wisenfeld in a more poetic mode, recounting a tale of illicit love, culminated but always out of reach of something more: "A light spinning, we perform/And outside, left you again to your wife/Through Victorian doorways."



On Cerulean, most of the lyrics were abstracted or masked from meaning by Wisenfeld's studio trickery with his vocal manipulations. Here, on Obsidian, Wisenfeld almost enters the painfully direct landscapes of Xiu Xiu and Perfume Genius, however, Wiesenfeld's purpose here, unlike the others, is not shock and make uncomfortable, but to show more humanity and true emotion. In "Incompatible," the only intimacy the character finds in their relationship is that they "share a toilet seat," realizing that "On the nights you roll over and introduce yourself/I am elsewhere." This bleakness with regards to relationships in general falls over into the Nine Inch Nails' "Closer" thump of "No Eyes" with Wiesenfeld practically spitting at his lover "it is only a matter of/Come and fuck me/And it is not a matter of/If you love me."



There is a haunting air of illness, suffering, and death on this record, however, it is not a stultifying experience or claustrophobic in any way. Obsidian is too expansive and open for that to occur. Even on "Earth Death," the stunning standout track on the record, with Wiesenfeld singing "Come kill me, I seem so alone" is appears more of an observation than just a plea for help, the thunderous production of booming drums and electronic drones pulsing and throbbing like a beast at prey. And there are several tracks that are driving and forceful. From the skittering drums and piano rolls of "Phaedra," to the Cure like basslines of "Ossuary,"



Wiesenfeld shows a tremendous range and depth in his production skills, hemming things in when necessary, but always allowing for experimentation, like on the stop-starting push of "No Past Lives."



2013 has been a completely amazing year for music so far, already eclipsing 2012, which I thought would be an impossible task. Obsidian is not just a great record, it is the confirmation of Will Wiesenfeld as the major talent that was only hinted at on his debut record Cerulean. Each listen to this brilliant record brings more and more layers and textures out of it. Obsidian is one of the best records of the year, and will figure high in my year end lists.

Rating Scale:

Chilfos: masterpiece; coolest thing I've heard in ages.

Woof Daddy: excellent; just a hair away from being a masterpiece.

Grrrr: very good; will definitely be considered for my top releases of the year.

Yeah Daddy Make Me Want It: good; definitely invites further listens and piques one's interest for more material.

Meh: not horrible, but certainly not great; could have either been polished, trimmed, or re-thought.

Jeez Lady: what the hell happened? Just plain bad. They should hang their heads in shame and be forced to listen to Lady Gaga ad nauseam as penance.

Tragicistani: so bad, armed villagers with pitchforks and torches should run the artist out of the country for inflicting this abomination on the human race.

Tuesday, May 28, 2013

Jam of the Day: CHVRCHES - "Gun"


More sparkling synthpop from the buzzy Scottish trio.

Album Review: Mount Kimbie - Cold Spring Fault Less Youth


Mount Kimbie
Cold Spring Fault Less Youth
Rating: Grrrr

London duo Mount Kimbie, Kai Campos and Dom Maker, emerged in the crowded UK bass music scene and were immediately lumped into the "post-dubstep" genre which actually isn't really a genre but more of a catch-all for artists that can't neatly be filed under categories like dubstep, funky, garage, or two-step. As the UK bass scene continued to morph, fracture, and evolve, the term post-dubstep lost any true meaning, if it had any to begin with in the first place. Mount Kimbie's first record Crooks and Lovers was an interesting, eclectic mix of two-step, IDM, and pastoral electronica that merged and shifted multiple genres into something distinctly their own. With their second record, they have moved on from mostly instrumentals to more vocal driven tracks, a la James Blake. This is not to say they have foregone any instrumentals or their eclectic music experimentation, but merely they have added a new, fascinating sense of direction and purpose with their music.

Relying on Campos' wistful vocals and two key collaborations with King Krule, Mount Kimbie move closer to more traditional pop structures, without truly giving up what makes them Mount Kimbie. There are still washes of woozy organs and gauzy keyboards and samples throughout the record. And the record itself, while produced completely via computer has a more organic and open sound. The feeling is instantaneous on opener "Home Recording" with droning organs and horn samples feeding off a shuffling beat and sense of loneliness conjured by Campos' voice.



This leads into the first amazing collaboration with King Krule, "You Took Your Time," which adds a needed air of pathos and dark poetry to their sound. His deep growl of a voice is forceful and haunting, urging the track on to darker and heavier levels.



"Meter, Pale, Tone," the second collaboration with King Krule, while not as immediately transfixing, has a subtler charm to it. Burbling electronics playfully work around slippery basslines and almost tribal percussion. King Krule's voice floats more in the mix this go around than the earlier track, which is an interesting experience considering how notable his voice usually stands out.



Campos' voice is a far less distinctive instrument, however, it is not without its charms. "Made To Stray" features an almost mantra-like vocal turn from Campos as a blocky beat and weird strains of different electronic sounds bump and rub up against one another,



while the sinister, droning "Blood and Form" has Campos speak-singing his words while the track takes odd turns here and there into noir territory.



Despite these more vocal-centric tracks, Mount Kimbie still allow several tracks to show off their production brilliance. "So Many Times, So Many Ways" grows from organ drones and lush percussion into a dense mix of electronics and sweeping synth strings,



"Slow" begins with an almost industrial feel before a mid-song change of direction into a lighter, funkier territory,



while closing track "Fall Out" blends tropical percussion, dub-influenced bass lines, and echoing, ambient synths.



There are only a couple of tracks on the record that don't work so well in the flow of the record. "Break Well" leans almost towards ambient wallpaper in the first half, before shifting into an incongruous back half section that feels very divorced from the track itself. "Sullen Ground" also plods and meanders over airy percussion and simple keyboard lines, Campos' vocals lightly dropped in and out of the mix. And "Lie Near" also leans too heavily on atmosphere without truly going anywhere. But in the grand scheme of things, these tracks are mere blips within the context of the rest of the tracks.

Cold Spring Fault Less Youth is a big leap forward for Mount Kimbie, echoing their initial sound while boldly striking out in new directions. Their experiments with more traditional songwriting and singing on the record appears to have given them a more focused purpose and has given us one of the standout electronic records of the year.

Rating Scale:

Chilfos: masterpiece; coolest thing I've heard in ages.

Woof Daddy: excellent; just a hair away from being a masterpiece.

Grrrr: very good; will definitely be considered for my top releases of the year.

Yeah Daddy Make Me Want It: good; definitely invites further listens and piques one's interest for more material.

Meh: not horrible, but certainly not great; could have either been polished, trimmed, or re-thought.

Jeez Lady: what the hell happened? Just plain bad. They should hang their heads in shame and be forced to listen to Lady Gaga ad nauseam as penance.

Tragicistani: so bad, armed villagers with pitchforks and torches should run the artist out of the country for inflicting this abomination on the human race.

Friday, May 24, 2013

Videos of the Week


Here are the videos that are taking me into the long holiday weekend:



Gorgeous, languid video for this amazing single from When Saints Go Machine.



Dark and sinister video from Beacon.



This 90s video inspired clip from Charli XCX matches this pop track perfectly.



Atmospheric clip from Irish duo Young Wonder.



Arty, B&W clip from Brit upstarts Palma Violets.

Wednesday, May 22, 2013

Jam of the Day: Kelly Rowland - "Dirty Laundry"


Surprisingly honest and direct track from Kelly Rowland.

Album Review: The National - Trouble Will Find Me


The National
Trouble Will Find Me
Rating: Grrrr

It is easy to overlook The National. They aren't flashy, gimmicky, or trendy. In fact, they are probably the most reliable band out there at the moment, always putting out record upon record of comfortable, assured alt-rock. I am sure the band is not thrilled about being considered the musical equivalent to a Lazy-Boy chair, but there is something nice in knowing that you are going to get what you get with The National, and their haunting lyrics and subtle way with melodies is never less than stunning. With their last album High Violet, I thought I had reached the saturation point with the band, believing they had reached the ultimate rung in their upwards trajectory, and a much needed U2/Radiohead sound+game changing shift in their output was needed. Several listens in to Trouble Will Find Me, I actually began to think this was true. While most records from The National require a growing period before you understand what they are going for, with this record I just didn't get it. Throwing my hands up in frustration, I began to develop the thought that "gasp" could this be my first review of theirs that would be less than glowing. Trouble Will Find Me is by far the most subdued record from The National, and perhaps that is what struck me as so odd about the record. There were no immediately killer singles like "Bloodbuzz Ohio" or "Squalor Victoria" that grabbed hold of you. For the most part, these songs are languid and tranquil, the subtle shifts in tone and melody are almost imperceptible at times. Although the tag "grower" is often used with The National, here it is very apropos, and it is almost frustratingly so. But once it ultimately sets hold, Trouble Will Find Me is completely rewarding and another stellar release in their canon.

The National are still commenting on middle class ennui and existential crises, and they always have some new and pointed way to make this sound fresh and not cloying. With lines like "I have only two emotions/Careful fear and dead devotion" from "Don't Swallow The Cap," "God loves everybody/don't remind me/I took the medicine and I went missing," from "Graceless," and "You didn't see me I was falling apart/I was a television version of a person with a broken heart," Matt Berninger and Co. have a knack for reaching into deep reservoirs of wry observations. And new to the band is a almost tongue in cheek playfulness, drawing from a deep knowledge of music and making sly references throughout the record. Towards the end of "Humiliation" Berninger drops lines from the chorus of "Blue Velvet," album closer "Hard to Find" drops "They can all/Just kiss off into the air" in reference to the Violent Femmes classic track "Kiss Off," while in "Don't Swallow the Cap" Berninger tells his lover that "If you want to see me cry/play Let It Be or Nevermind." These humorous asides littered through the record bring some much needed levity to what is basically their most somber, and stately record.

Most of the tracks are down tempo, with melodies that take awhile to make their presence known. Only on a few occasions does the band amp things up, and even then, they are not necessarily barn burners. Tracks like "Sea of Love," while more forceful, take their time building into something fiery,



"Graceless" is the most driving song, featuring another solid backbeat from drummer Bryan Devendorf, while "Don't Swallow the Cap" builds to a sublime state of raw intensity.



Aside from these tracks, the rest of Trouble Will Find Me is a more introspective and moody affair which is what initially made me pause in my assessment of the record. But once you get over the fact that the pace of the record is going to be more languid, you can inhabit these gorgeous tracks and let their intricate and sublime melodies wash over you and take you within yourself. I love the quiet interplay between guitars and strings on the haunting "Fireproof," the majestic piano-led ballad "Pink Rabbits," and the lumbering behemoth of "Demons" which feels on the cusp of banality until it suddenly takes a slight turn into one of their most affecting moments.



It is essential to give Trouble Will Find Me time to reveal its subtle secrets. I will admit to almost giving up on the record several times, my anxious brain incapable of allowing this record's charms to wind themselves within me. Thankfully I resisted the urge to put this record on the shelf, and now I find it is currently one of favorite records from The National. In this age of constant musical barrage, there is something to be said for a record that stands on its own terms, not needing anything other that its own beauty to sing its praises.

Rating Scale:

Chilfos: masterpiece; coolest thing I've heard in ages.

Woof Daddy: excellent; just a hair away from being a masterpiece.

Grrrr: very good; will definitely be considered for my top releases of the year.

Yeah Daddy Make Me Want It: good; definitely invites further listens and piques one's interest for more material.

Meh: not horrible, but certainly not great; could have either been polished, trimmed, or re-thought.

Jeez Lady: what the hell happened? Just plain bad. They should hang their heads in shame and be forced to listen to Lady Gaga ad nauseam as penance.

Tragicistani: so bad, armed villagers with pitchforks and torches should run the artist out of the country for inflicting this abomination on the human race.

Happy 16th Birthday!: Radiohead - OK Computer


Hard to believe this record is 16 years old, and also that the record still holds up to this day. This record will likely always find a spot in my all-time Top Ten.

Tuesday, May 21, 2013

Jam of the Day: Skinny Puppy - "wornin"


Interesting new approach from industrial titans Skinny Puppy, opting for a more direct, electro approach to their sound. Lead track off their new album Weapon is a buzzy start to things.

Video: When Saints Go Machine - "Iodine"


Languid yet engrossing clip from Danish electro-poppers When Saints Go Machine.

Album Review: Queens of the Stone Age - ...Like Clockwork


Queens of the Stone Age
...Like Clockwork
Rating: Grrrr

Josh Homme brings his revolving cast of support players back to life for Queens of the Stone Age's sixth album ...Like Clockwork. In the past, Homme has sometimes bitten off more than he could chew, littering his work with so many guest stars that you felt like he was crashing Timbaland's studio. A lot of his collaborations make sense, for example adding drum god Dave Grohl in the mix on Songs for the Deaf, to me, QOTSA's best and most consistent record. However, some just plain don't work and feel like Homme leaning on the shoulders of his famous friends, i.e., Julian Casablanca's vocals on "Sick Sick Sick," off Era Vulgaris, or Jack Black's "handclaps" on "Burn The Witch" from Lullabies To Paralyze. But more often than not, he gets it right, and thankfully on ...Like Clockwork there is a seamless quality to the flow of the record, and while there are some very heavy hitters here (Trent Reznor and Sir Elton John), no one sticks out like a sore thumb, and they are nicely integrated into the QOTSA fold. In the past, my main issue with QOTSA albums was the fact that there would be two or three amazing, killer singles and the rest, while not horrible, felt an awful lot like filler. Going into first listens of ...Like Clockwork this weighed heavy in the back of my mind, however, I was pleasantly surprised how cohesive and solid this record was.

For me, QOTSA excel when they just let the riffs rip and the volume amp up. There are almost too many treasures here to choose from, with Homme feeling more inspired that he has in years. The blistering onslaught of "My God Is The Sun" drives on forcefully under Grohl's fierce drums, squalling guitar work, and fuzz bass,



album highlight "If I Had A Tail" is a proto-Rolling Stones bluesified strut,



"I Sat By The Ocean" is a slowly building track of intertwining guitars, handclaps, and a steady backbeat,



while the raucous "Fairweather Friends" features an all-star cast of supporting players (Trent Reznor, Sir Elton John, Nick Oliveri, and Mark Lanegan) but somehow they all fit into the mix together with no showboating.

And there are lots of more toned down moments that add to the flow of the record while not making things come to a full stop. "The Vampyre of Time and Memory" is a elegantly goth ballad, focusing on gorgeous piano and Homme's supple voice, closing title track is a surprisingly moving piano ballad with Homme stretching his voice high into his upper register, and "Kalopsia" is an atmospheric, relatively understated collaboration between Homme and Reznor,



Seriously, I was expecting ...Like Clockwork to be another middling record from QOTSA that I would pilfer for the killer singles, leaving the flotsom and jetsum of the filler tracks culled on the wayside. Imagine my immense surprise when the record turned out not only to be one of QOTSA's best records but, quite frankly, also one of the best rock records of the year. Sorry Mr. Homme for ever doubting you and your talent.

Rating Scale:

Chilfos: masterpiece; coolest thing I've heard in ages.

Woof Daddy: excellent; just a hair away from being a masterpiece.

Grrrr: very good; will definitely be considered for my top releases of the year.

Yeah Daddy Make Me Want It: good; definitely invites further listens and piques one's interest for more material.

Meh: not horrible, but certainly not great; could have either been polished, trimmed, or re-thought.

Jeez Lady: what the hell happened? Just plain bad. They should hang their heads in shame and be forced to listen to Lady Gaga ad nauseam as penance.

Tragicistani: so bad, armed villagers with pitchforks and torches should run the artist out of the country for inflicting this abomination on the human race.

New: Beyonce - "Grown Woman"


Full version of a track briefly heard in a Pepsi commercial.

Monday, May 20, 2013

Jam of the Day: Kisses - "Bruins"


Deceptively simple synthpop from Kisses. This song off their album Kids In LA builds into something sublime.

Album Review: Daft Punk - Random Access Memories


Daft Punk
Random Access Memories
Rating: Meh

To me, Guy-Manuel de Homem-Christo and Thomas Bangalter are essentially brilliant marketers who always seem to find the right amount of mystery, hype, and musical wherewithal to keep them in the public's eye while really not having any sort of prolific output. Granted, I will say their first two albums, Homework and Discovery, are both killer dance albums; however, since then, they have pretty much coasted on their laurels and have only released the dismal Human After All and the ho-hum soundtrack for Tron: Legacy. As fitting their marketing acumen, the lead up to the release of Random Access Memories has been suitably brilliant. Releasing short commercial teasers on SNL, promo spots at Coachella, and slyly letting "leaked" versions of first single "Get Lucky" find the light of day, there was already a built up frenzy of excitement for the new record. The biggest question was what would the album sound like. Homem-Christo and Bangalter indicated in interviews that the album was a return to a more album-oriented recording process, eschewing laptops and digital production for more traditional instrumentation and analog recording procedures.

The album definitely comes across as a reaction to the explosion of EDM across the globe and, perhaps, this "step back" was a calculated effort on the duo's behalf not to be lost in the vast sea of artists out of there. With that said, they truly could not have come up with a more jarring tonal shift on this record. Random Access Memories is short the traditional Daft Punk bangers that we are accustomed to, and heavy on 70s prog-rock, yacht rock, and disco explorations. So, in this EDM crazy market at the moment, Daft Punk has staked their own territory so to speak, if not exactly groundbreaking, it at least sounds unlike most dance records you will hear this year. And you are not likely to find a more gorgeously recorded and produced album. The warmth and sonic details here are quite impressive. The album feels full bodied and enveloping, as if you can live within its grooves.

The problem with the record, though, is that regardless of whether the record sounds great or not, if the songs aren't there to back the sound up, there certainly is no point to taking all that extra care. On first few listens, Random Access Memories felt like a major dud to me, full of very trite and tired 70s genre exercises that could basically have been done by any other act with little to minimal effort. For one, you really have to divorce yourself from the fact that this is not the Daft Punk of old. You are not going to get any four to the floor bangers heavy on samples. Instead, you are getting an "organic" Daft Punk record that basically is more designed for background lounge music than filling up huge, cavernous dance clubs. Multiple listens, while still not really giving me any wow factor, did however draw me into the warmth of the record, and for that, I will applaud them for spending what is obviously a lot of time and putting a lot of love into making the record sound wonderful. But throughout my listens, I am always kept at arms length somehow, despite the fact that there are some decent tracks on this record. When Daft Punk stops trying to make grandiose statements and just makes a good track, my interest is piqued. First single "Get Lucky," while initially sort of a non-event for me, is definitely the earworm of the record; Nile Rodgers' inviting guitar washes and the elegant disco cool of the track are hard to defend against.



And most of the major collaborations on the record actually were some of my favorites. "Instant Crush" with vocals from Julian Casablancas is surprisingly tender, and Casablanca's delivers one of his most human sounding vocals, ironic considering they are heavily vocodered.



Animal Collective's Panda Bear fits almost too comfortably within the confines of the mid-tempo electro number "Doin' It Right," his warm chants creating a nice contrast to the treated vocals.



Final track "Contact" with house producer DJ Falcon is by far the most Daft Punkian of tracks on the record, and sadly, it ends the record with you wanting a little more of that sound.



Other tracks that work well are the quietly gorgeous instrumental "Motherboard"



and the "Something About Us" referencing ballad "The Game of Love," which finds Daft Punk milking their vocodor sadness once again.



The rest of the record is wildly uneven, however, with the band failing to add much spin on already played out takes on disco and prog-rock. "Give Life Back To Music" starts the album with warmed over, disco-lite grooves and very little in the way of surprise. "Giorgio by Moroder," is a well-intentioned tribute to the disco pioneer, however, it just never comes across as anything by Daft Punk aping Moroder. "Lose Yourself To Dance," the other collaboration with Pharrell Williams, lacks the spark and life of "Get Lucky" and gets mired in lame handclaps and generic Nile Rodgers' guitar lines. And we don't need to go into much detail on the disastrous "Touch" which almost stopped the record dead in its tracks with 8+ minutes of prog-rock noodling, vampy piano rolls, and a WTF? vocal performance from Paul Williams which makes the track feel like it stepped out of an episode of The Muppet Show circa 1978.

The uneven feel of Random Access Memories detracts from it being anything other than a low-key, just ok album from the duo. I will say the record gradually gets better over the long haul, and it definitely helps to listen to the tracks as intended, as a full length album meant to be heard in sequence. I only wish there were more highs on the record, and the highs that are here, though few and far between, lacked any immediate punch that the duo have given their singles in the past. When it gets down to brass tax, Random Access Memories is a better idea than a fully realized collection of songs. It's the songs that matter, and unfortunately, Daft Punk seem to have lost that for the moment.

Rating Scale:

Chilfos: masterpiece; coolest thing I've heard in ages.

Woof Daddy: excellent; just a hair away from being a masterpiece.

Grrrr: very good; will definitely be considered for my top releases of the year.

Yeah Daddy Make Me Want It: good; definitely invites further listens and piques one's interest for more material.

Meh: not horrible, but certainly not great; could have either been polished, trimmed, or re-thought.

Jeez Lady: what the hell happened? Just plain bad. They should hang their heads in shame and be forced to listen to Lady Gaga ad nauseam as penance.

Tragicistani: so bad, armed villagers with pitchforks and torches should run the artist out of the country for inflicting this abomination on the human race.

Friday, May 17, 2013

Jam of the Day: Kylesa - "Unspoken"


Dark and melodic track off the Savannah, Georgia metal band's upcoming record Ultraviolet.

Videos of the Week


Somehow this year is quickly slipping by, June is just around the corner. These are the videos that kept me from shaking my head in disbelief:



Stunning black and white clip for this breathtaking track from UK buzz band London Grammar.



Fuzzed out pop song gets a strangely human and heartbreaking video.



Another hypersurreal and violent animated video from QOTSA's upcoming album ... Like Clockwork.



Strange, frenetic video from up and coming Danish singer MØ.



Pretty amazing single from Holy Ghost! gets a fun, colorful video.



Bizarre, CGI video from Young Galaxy that somehow fits the song's tropical vibe.



Amazing song from rapper Kendrick Lamar.







Wednesday, May 15, 2013

Jam of the Day: London Grammar - "Wasting My Young Years"



Amazing track from an upcoming EP from this wise beyond their years London trio; think The xx fronted by Florence and the Machine. When the chorus kicks in on this song, prepare for an unexpected primal emotional kick to the guts.

Album Review: Hands - Synesthesia


Hands
Synesthesia
Rating: Yeah Daddy Make Me Want It

Hands, an LA by-way-of Philly quartet made up of Geoff Halliday, Ryan Sweeney, Sean Hess and Alex Staniloff, are likely to follow in the footsteps of their former tour mates Foster The People in that they make up an almost irresistible mix of swirly electronic and alt-rock/pop that worms its way into your brain at an alarming rate. What sets them apart from Foster The People is a more adventurous spirit which finds the band willing to explore darker sounds and allow their sound to breathe and go in different directions. While some of these directions don't necessarily fit them in the overall scheme of things, the experimentation shows they are not willing to only be pigeon-holed in one sound.

Their debut record Synesthesia works best when it strays a little bit off the beaten path. "Videolove" begins with a dark, electronica vibe, with moody synths, haunting samples, and atmospheric guitar work that build to an almost bright synth-driven coda;



"Nothing But Animals" again works up from tense electronics into a bright and airy guitar workout;

while "Brave Motion" works in some more angular guitar work while Halliday's vocals get more and more frantic.



Where Synesthesia doesn't work is when Hands' influences overcome the tracks or where the band leans a little too close to generic alt-electro pop. "Lonesome Body" sounds like an Animal Collective B-side, with its dense production, herky-jerky vocal delivery, and anthemic chorus; while lead track "Trouble" marches in line with the direction set out by Foster the People with its bouncy rhythms and synths;



and "House of Jars" pokes and meanders through spacey synths, drugged out vocals, and a tepid drum track.

Thankfully, these moments pass quickly and they get back to making some damn catchy tracks like the joyously giddy synth and guitar romp "The Game Is Changing Us" which should be a huge radio hit if there is any justice in the world;



the odd jazzy-into-atmospheric synth and guitar textured jam "Kinetic;"

or the soaring, airy guitar pop of the gorgeous track "Elegant Road."

Overall, Synesthesia is an excellent debut for the band, showing enough promise that they will further carve out their own distinct niche in a relatively crowded alt-pop field. It helps that they consistently craft some pretty darn catchy tracks which bring you back time and time again to this album. With some more touring and more exposure, I can definitely see this band taking off. Just sit back and watch.

Rating Scale:

Chilfos: masterpiece; coolest thing I've heard in ages.

Woof Daddy: excellent; just a hair away from being a masterpiece.

Grrrr: very good; will definitely be considered for my top releases of the year.

Yeah Daddy Make Me Want It: good; definitely invites further listens and piques one's interest for more material.

Meh: not horrible, but certainly not great; could have either been polished, trimmed, or re-thought.

Jeez Lady: what the hell happened? Just plain bad. They should hang their heads in shame and be forced to listen to Lady Gaga ad nauseam as penance.

Tragicistani: so bad, armed villagers with pitchforks and torches should run the artist out of the country for inflicting this abomination on the human race.

Tuesday, May 14, 2013

Jam of the Day: When Saints Go Machine - "Iodine"


Second single off their upcoming record Infinity Pool is this gorgeous track that effortlessly moves from minor to major key.

Album Review: Young Galaxy - Ultramarine


Young Galaxy
Ultramarine
Rating: Grrrr

Montreal quintet Young Galaxy's first records went practically unnoticed by me, their Broken Social Scene/Arcade Fire-lite alternative rock was workman like and pleasant but lacked any type of individual spark that would make them transcend the comparisons with their countrymen. It wasn't until 2011's Shapeshifting that something interesting happened. The band, feeling a bizarre need to shake things up, sent the tapes for Shapeshifting over to Dan Lissik, former member of Swedish pop act Studio, who spread his Balearic magic over the album's 11 tracks. There was something fortuitous in this partnership as the resulting album gave the band much needed spark and buzz. It was an album of elegantly gorgeous synth pop that just got better and better with each listen. Wanting to keep their forward momentum going, Young Galaxy once again enlisted the production duties of Dan Lissik, and have come up with another interesting batch of tracks that builds upon the foundation set by Shapeshifting. Ultramarine is not as brilliant or game changing as its predecessor but has its own charms and high points.

The one main change is the elevation of Catherine McCandless to main vocalist, forgoing any vocals from guitarist Stephen Ramsay. I enjoyed the back and forth between the two vocalists on Shapeshifting and it is the one element that I find missing from Ultramarine, however, despite this one major change the record as whole holds up remarkably well. Ultramarine opens strongly with the amazing single "Pretty Boy," a gorgeous, soaring track with undulating synth arpeggios, strings, and a bouncy drum track.



While the tracks on Shapeshifting moved and flowed in and out of each very well, there is a startling jump here and there in musical styles here on Ultramarine that takes a bit of getting used to before settling into a rhythm. From the shimmering synth pop of the opener, things take a sudden leap into sunkissed reggae and tropicalia on "Fall For You," which then springs into the fractured electro-pop of standout track "New Summer." Akin to my favorite track of last year, Sun Airway's "Laketop Swimmers," "New Summer" is an elegant ode to summer and it's intoxicating freeness that always seems to fade too fast.



From there the album ping pongs around, from the lovely dream pop of "Hard to Tell,"



slinky dance punk of "Out the Gate Backwards,"



to the wonky synth workout of "Privileged Poor,"



Young Galaxy finds away to always keep the listener guessing as to which direction they are headed. At times this approach can be a little bit exhausting as the flow of the album is a bit choppy. But the hooks and pristine production are too good to keep one from belaboring the point for too long.

Although Ultramarine lacks the OMG! moment that Shapeshifting brought to the band, but once you let the album work its magic over you it holds its own surprises. Young Galaxy feels more confident this go around, with a closer working relationship with Lissik bringing out their adventurous side, showing how they can effortlessly move between different genre experiments while still sounding like Young Galaxy. Ultramarine is a worthy follow up to Shapeshifting, and moves Young Galaxy into new and more varied territory.

Rating Scale:

Chilfos: masterpiece; coolest thing I've heard in ages.

Woof Daddy: excellent; just a hair away from being a masterpiece.

Grrrr: very good; will definitely be considered for my top releases of the year.

Yeah Daddy Make Me Want It: good; definitely invites further listens and piques one's interest for more material.

Meh: not horrible, but certainly not great; could have either been polished, trimmed, or re-thought.

Jeez Lady: what the hell happened? Just plain bad. They should hang their heads in shame and be forced to listen to Lady Gaga ad nauseam as penance.

Tragicistani: so bad, armed villagers with pitchforks and torches should run the artist out of the country for inflicting this abomination on the human race.

New: Holy Ghost! - "Dumb Disco Ideas"


For those missing LCD Soundsystem, here is a new track from Holy Ghost! that should give you some solace. I am digging their more funky side.

Video: Queens of the Stone Age - "Kalopsia"


Nightmarish animated clip for this moody track from their upcoming record ...Like Clockwork.

Concert Watch: James Blake - "Retrograde"


Thrilled to be able to see him tonight at the Masquerade. I am hoping the venue's notoriously bad sound system holds up for his more nuanced music. So far this year, nothing has come very close to the perfection that is "Retrograde." Here is the stunning video.

Monday, May 13, 2013

Jam of the Day: Whirr - "Swoon"


Nick Bassett, former guitarist for black metal act Deafheaven, ushers forth a new EP for his current band Whirr. Around contains this dreamy track "Swoon" which finds the band trying to approximate the feeling with pretty good success.

Album Review: Vampire Weekend - Modern Vampires Of The City


Vampire Weekend
Modern Vampires Of The City
Rating: Woof Daddy

At times, Vampire Weekend seem to be the easiest band to hate in the world. Dismissed a lot of times as upper-class, pretentious posers who wrongfully appropriated Afro-pop, few have ever really dared to look at how such appropriation itself was an wry, ironic take on just such appropriation. Despite all this hatred towards their J.Crew take on such musical genres, few could really deny that the band has its chops, and the juicy lyrically interplay was enough to stump even the most scholarly of critics. While there is nothing overtly different on Modern Vampires of the City, multiple listens of the record reveal a staggering jump in confidence and approach to their sound. For the first time, Vampire Weekend have dropped their snooty archness and reveal a truly emotional and warm heart that permeates the record. Ezra Koenig inhabits these characters and stories as if they are his second skin. Lyrically, there are still the usual arcane references, in-jokes, puns, and elaborate catalogs of events and place names, but instead of used in a pat-my-own-back style, they are used in a way that integrates fully with the characters and stories. Modern Vampires of the City is Vampire Weekend's most emotionally mature and "adult" record, a chronicle of growing up and realizing that the young always want to be older and the old want to be younger, never fully experiencing life in the moment and with purpose, but sadly with regret.

Bookended by two stately tracks, this album is their first that doesn't immediately jump into the Afro-pop they are known for, taking a more measured, elegantly chamber-pop oriented direction. "Obvious Bicycle" uses a Ras Michael reggae sample along with clanking percussion and resonating piano chords to recount the tale of an out of work friend who is counseled to "spare your face the razor/Because no one’s gonna spare the time for you" which perfectly captures that sense of not being at one with the world.



While "Young Lion" closes things out with delicately ornate piano and choral vocals, urging these people in transition to "take your time."

But throughout Modern Vampires of the City there is a restless experimentation with their sound, refusing to stay in any type of rut or remain steadfast to their old records. They allow songs to open up and breathe, not afraid to stray from their former, hook-ridden focus. Of course, this doesn't mean that Vampire Weekend gave up hooks altogether. The singles so far on this record are particularly brilliant. "Step" is an elegant, harpsichord led mid-tempo track that finds Koenig's voice achingly tender and emotive. The track feeds off the themes of the record, with the haunting line "Wisdom's a gift, but you'd trade it for youth/Age is an honor -- it's still not the truth."



"Diane Young" (a pun on the little too bleak for comfort "Dying Young") trades 50s style vocal delivery with horn skronks and driving percussion for another take on a character unsure where they are going, but attempting to live fast and die young, with the mantra: "Nobody knows what the future holds/And it’s bad enough just getting old/Live my life in self-defense/You know I love the past, ’cause I hate suspense."



And "Ya Hey" twisting and turning the vocals into electronic hysterics over a stately beat, twinkling keyboards, and swooning synths.



The album and perhaps their entire career leads up their most beautiful and emotionally direct song, "Hannah Hunt." Koenig's voice is barely a whisper through the first 2:40 of the track, recounting a couple's cross-country journey from awareness to doubt, where suddenly the track erupts and Koenig's voice practically rips out of its restraints. It is a remarkable song that holds immense depths of heart and feeling, and echoes anyone that has come up short with their belief in another person. The album is full of such intimate moments that speak to the amazing assurance Koenig and Co. have in their craft. This willingness to forgo the kitsch of their sound comes out again on another standout track, the haunting organ drones and skittering percussion of "Hudson" which builds on a martial pace and somber choral figure.

Of course, there are still plenty of earworm tracks that will throw you around with hooks galore. Koenig breathlessly flows through "Worship You" as the drums reach a fevered pitch under dizzying guitars and soaring strings. "Finger Back" could easily fit on either of their first two albums with its infectious, herky-jerky rhythms and blitzkrieg delivery. And "Unbelievers" features a gorgeous, heartfelt vocal where Koenig worries about relationships in this world besotted by religion, wondering if different beliefs can ever work together, saying to his love "I know I love you/and you love the sea/but what Holy water contains /a little drop, little drop for me?"



Modern Vampires of the City feels like a major leap forward for the band, while in actuality it has been hinted at all along. It is a journey they do not seem eager to rush, allowing each of their other records to stand on their own as well form a base for this, quite frankly one of the most stunning pop albums of recent memory. Yes, you can still slag them as poser hipsters, but it is very difficult to say they don't know what the hell they are doing. This is a record that will hold up over time and will considered a classic, its themes are always topical, and their approach with the record as a whole is nothing short of masterful.

Rating Scale:

Chilfos: masterpiece; coolest thing I've heard in ages.

Woof Daddy: excellent; just a hair away from being a masterpiece.

Grrrr: very good; will definitely be considered for my top releases of the year.

Yeah Daddy Make Me Want It: good; definitely invites further listens and piques one's interest for more material.

Meh: not horrible, but certainly not great; could have either been polished, trimmed, or re-thought.

Jeez Lady: what the hell happened? Just plain bad. They should hang their heads in shame and be forced to listen to Lady Gaga ad nauseam as penance.

Tragicistani: so bad, armed villagers with pitchforks and torches should run the artist out of the country for inflicting this abomination on the human race.

Friday, May 10, 2013

Jam of the Day: Clockwork - "Places"


Slinky two-step track off their upcoming album B.O.A.T.S.(Based On A True Story).

Videos of the Week


Friday!!!!!! Here are the videos that glitter bombed me this week:



Third video from David Bowie's latest record finds Bowie in a more controversial mode, skewering the Catholic church.



Dreamy, shimmering song from Smith Westerns gets an equally dreamy clip.



Mesmerizing clip from Aussies PVT.



Trippy animated clip for this rousing track from Hands.



Very weird animated clip for Team Spirit.



Haunting and beautiful video made from paper cut-outs.

Thursday, May 9, 2013

Jam of the Day: Young Wonder - "Seventeen"


Purity Ring-inspired glitch pop from Young Wonder. Their take on the style is a little less gloomy and atmospheric and more funky. "Seventeen" is off their new EP, Show Your Teeth.

New: Queens of the Stone Age - "I Sat By The Ocean" & "If I Had A Tail"


Queens of the Stone Age performed two new tracks from the upcoming album ...Like Clockwork in an in-studio performance for Belgian radio.



Wednesday, May 8, 2013

Jam of the Day: Say Lou Lou ft. Chet Faker - "Fool of Me"


Gorgeous pop ballad from the Australian/Swedish duo.

Album Review: Deerhunter - Monomania


Deerhunter
Monomania
Rating: Yeah Daddy Make Me Want It

Five albums in to their quite eccentric career, Atlanta based Deerhunter never play it safe. From their earliest songs that bit and snarled in a muck of in-the-red sonic obfuscation, through to their shoegaze explorations, and more recently, their more tempered and crystalline moments of pure pop bliss, the band has challenged its fans and listeners with each new foray, never quite going over the line of willing alienation. Well, until now. To get it out of the way, Monomania is a fucking mess. It almost goes back to the overwhelming cacophony of their debut album at times, and the first few listens had me checking to make sure I hadn't stumbled upon some batch of outtakes that never should have seen the light of day. Specifically, the first two tracks tested and still test my patience. The whiplash sonics of sludgy, psych rock opener "Neon Junkyard" preview one of the least endearing characteristics of Monomania, which is the choice to shove Bradford Cox's vocals so high and distorted in the mix it overwhelms everything. There is a good idea here in this first track, however, it is the execution of said idea that is way off the mark. Things do not improve on the noisefest known as "Leather Jacket II" which is three excruciating minutes of ear bleed vocals, out of tune guitars, muddied production, and a design for pure sonic torture.

These two horrific tracks alone were almost enough to get me to cry Uncle, thankfully things snapped back into place with the absolutely gorgeous track "The Missing" with its intertwined guitar play and subtle washes of analog keyboards. Hope restored. On "Pensacola," Deerhunter use the same sort of sloppy, garage band approach from the first two tracks, but allow the hook to drive the track and not the production, which carries over into the shambolic, head-bobber "Deam Captain." It is really not until the mid-section of the record where things rise to the level we expect from Deerhunter. "Blue Agent" revels in its delicate guitar back and forth and subtle vocal from Cox. "T.H.M." provides tension and contrast between the lovely, shimmering guitars and Cox's increasingly manic vocal. Album highlight "Sleepwalking" draws from both shoegaze and 50s rock for an interesting combination.

And while the album continues in a more muted pattern, eschewing the sloppiness of the leading tracks, it becomes a more transcendent experience, the guitars become mantra like, taking you out of yourself into hypnotic territory. "Back to the Middle" takes a more repetitive approach with its ringing guitars that are layered over one another expertly. Likewise, "Monomania" uses Cox's vocals almost as a lead instrument, coating it in dark echo and reverb, aligning it with the dark waves of guitar.



Monomania is a hard album to like and it constantly makes you want to turn it off. Within all the sonic sludgery, there is a great album lurking in here, crying desperately to get out. I want to love it, I really want to just enjoy it, but it keeps bitch slapping and pistol whipping you uncontrollably. I think this record will be more interesting to listen to when their sixth album comes out. I want to see if this is just an odd excursion into bizarre territory, a giant fuck you as the band self-implodes, or if it just a water-testing exploration which will take Deerhunter into some other grandiose new world. For now, I am scratching my head, interested of course, but very confused.

Rating Scale:

Chilfos: masterpiece; coolest thing I've heard in ages.

Woof Daddy: excellent; just a hair away from being a masterpiece.

Grrrr: very good; will definitely be considered for my top releases of the year.

Yeah Daddy Make Me Want It: good; definitely invites further listens and piques one's interest for more material.

Meh: not horrible, but certainly not great; could have either been polished, trimmed, or re-thought.

Jeez Lady: what the hell happened? Just plain bad. They should hang their heads in shame and be forced to listen to Lady Gaga ad nauseam as penance.

Tragicistani: so bad, armed villagers with pitchforks and torches should run the artist out of the country for inflicting this abomination on the human race.

New: These New Puritans - "Fragment Two"


New track from These New Puritans' upcoming third album Field of Reeds.

Tuesday, May 7, 2013

Jam of the Day: Vampire Weekend - "Step"


Achingly beautiful track from Vampire Weekend.

Album Review: Savages - Silence Yourself


Savages
Silence Yourself
Rating: Grrrr

We live in an age where there is so much technological overkill it is a wonder we can ever find peace and quiet these days, our senses overwhelmed to the point of exhaustion. London quartet Savages appear to be railing against this turn of events, proclaiming in their manifesto that "”The world used to be silent. Now it has too many voices. The noise is a constant distraction." They have even gone so far as to try and, while not outright ban use of cell phones at concerts, at least make the audience aware that they are missing out on the connection between the band and audience by focusing too much on technology. While their music might add to said noise, it it is definitely going to grab and hold your attention. Although I have yet to see Savages live, it has been reported (which wasn't word of mouth the best way to hear of a band in the first place?) that their live shows are a revelation, and if the music on their assured debut Silence Yourself is any indication, I can definitely see why. Missing the post-punk revival by at least 10 years, Savages don't wallow in the mire of Joy Division, but align themselves more with the economy of sound of early Wire coupled with the brash feminism of Siouxsie and the Banshees while still allowing more modern influences seep in here and there, be it PJ Harvey's commanding way with a riff, or Karen O's astonishing lead vocal presence.

Silence Yourself has no shortage of icy, brittle post-punk fury, full of scraping guitars and the ominous bass work of Ayse Hassan, which for me is the driving force behind the record, reminding me so much of Carlos Dengler's melodic bass lines on Interpol's early albums. The chugging opener "Shut Up" roars out of the gate with antagonistic interplay between the tightly would guitars and the free-wheeling rhythm section, singer Jehnny Beth barely able to keep control of her vocals as all the pieces come to life at the track's end.



Pounding drums and swirling echo laden guitar riffs come up against bass lines on "I Am Here" with Beth's vocals deeply held in control, "City's Full" brings on a full air raid siren attack of guitars, while the squall of guitars on "No Face" threaten to derail but always are kept in check.



While the excitement of these tracks is certainly intoxicating, when Savages slow things down and show their deft touch on atmosphere and texture is where the album truly came alive for me. The lurching, sludgy riffs of "Strife" led me back to memories of bands like Loop, where repetition became transcendent,



"Waiting For A Sign" is a haunting, dirge like track with shimmering, ringing guitars and a deeply evocative vocal turn from Beth,



while closing track "Marshal Dear" brings in piano and shockingly an un-ironic saxophone into the mix for one of the most striking tracks on the record.

There are only a couple of times on the record where the band lets things get slightly out of control. "She Will" starts off promisingly with its driving beats and echoing guitars that recall early U2, but by the chorus, Beth unleashes a rather dead on Karen O impression that stands out like a sore thumb next to the reigned in verses.



And "Husbands" somehow never feels more than just an unfinished sketch of a song, and lurches a little too close to manic punk, which doesn't meld with the rest of the record.



Aside from a couple of blips, though, Silence Yourself is by far one of the most confident debut albums I have heard in awhile. It has undeniable energy that cannot be ignored easily. It's so refreshing to see a band that knows what it wants and goes about doing it with confidence and style. Based on this amazing record, I can see big things in store for this band in the future. They are in fact, the future.

Rating Scale:

Chilfos: masterpiece; coolest thing I've heard in ages.

Woof Daddy: excellent; just a hair away from being a masterpiece.

Grrrr: very good; will definitely be considered for my top releases of the year.

Yeah Daddy Make Me Want It: good; definitely invites further listens and piques one's interest for more material.

Meh: not horrible, but certainly not great; could have either been polished, trimmed, or re-thought.

Jeez Lady: what the hell happened? Just plain bad. They should hang their heads in shame and be forced to listen to Lady Gaga ad nauseam as penance.

Tragicistani: so bad, armed villagers with pitchforks and torches should run the artist out of the country for inflicting this abomination on the human race.

Letterman: James Blake - "Retrograde"


James Blake on Letterman performing what is, for me, the single of the year.

Monday, May 6, 2013

Jam of the Day: Kate Boy - "The Way We Are"


A darker, more EBM sounding track from Kate Boy. I like the harder edge, while still retaining their own sound.

Video: Queens of the Stone Age - "I Appear Missing"


New track from QOTSA's upcoming album ...Like Clockwork has a very creepy animated video.

Album Review: Letherette - Letherette


Letherette
Letherette
Rating: Grrrr

Wolverhampton duo Letherette, Andy Harber and Richard Roberts, are going to get lost in the wake of the oncoming hurricane caused by the release of Daft Punk's new record, and it will be a pity. While Letherette definitely draw their initial influence from the house music titans, it is merely a stepping off point for a record that is so much more than the sum of its influences. Granted, the first few tracks almost seem like Daft Punk-by-numbers, and by that point in listening to their debut I believed I had them pegged. But Letherette is structured more as a deep cuts DJ set, taking you on a journey, with many highs coupled with interesting sojourns into darker, more contemplative territory.

Of course, the main focus will be on the more dancy, Daft Punk inspired cuts, of which there are many. Opener "After Dawn" slides on by with bright, airy synth lines over a chunky beat, slippery basslines, and clipped vocal samples. First single "D&T" could easily be a long lost Daft Punk b-side, except for the fact is actually quite better than anything the French duo have done over their last two records. A beginning section of simple synth patterns and standard house drum track evolves into a a more dense and fruitful composition, with the beat becoming more stuttered and funky, and 80s guitar riffs thrown around with abandon.



But after this sort of bait and switch, the album really starts to play with its conventions, turning its house base onto itself. "Restless," one of the few vocal numbers, would be far more at home on a garage compilation, leaning almost over to future R&B. "The One" easily moves from ambient undertones into an intricate collage of sampled madness, before segueing into the downtempo gorgeousness of "Gas Stations & Restaurants."



From there, the tracks get more involved and exploratory, never staying long in one genre or mood. Asian influences collide with thick, funky beats and skittering samples on "Cold Clam," the beats kick into high gear with the wondrous club thump of "Warstones,"



while "Boosted" eagerly mixes icy keys with a subtly funky bass undercarriage and meanders effortlessly across its run time.



The ending of the record really shows Letherette going off into more atmospheric territory. "Hard Martha" adds more texture to its cityscape beats, accenting the low synth drones with a lonely undertow,



and closing track "Say The Sun" ends things on a downward turn, with echoing, somber keyboards and delicate guitar lines overlaying a midtempo beat.



Letherette is not a game changer in the electronic music world but I don't believe that was the point of this record. What it is is a solid record that takes chances when it needs to, and also toys with your expectations, making it seem like it is going in one direction, then slowly twisting things into a new direction, making everything that came before it come into question. While most people are breathlessly awaiting the new Daft Punk record, I will continue to listen to this album, as it by far makes a much more bold statement to me.

Rating Scale:

Chilfos: masterpiece; coolest thing I've heard in ages.

Woof Daddy: excellent; just a hair away from being a masterpiece.

Grrrr: very good; will definitely be considered for my top releases of the year.

Yeah Daddy Make Me Want It: good; definitely invites further listens and piques one's interest for more material.

Meh: not horrible, but certainly not great; could have either been polished, trimmed, or re-thought.

Jeez Lady: what the hell happened? Just plain bad. They should hang their heads in shame and be forced to listen to Lady Gaga ad nauseam as penance.

Tragicistani: so bad, armed villagers with pitchforks and torches should run the artist out of the country for inflicting this abomination on the human race.

Friday, May 3, 2013

Jam of the Day: Knife Party - "LRAD"


Great dance track off their upcoming Haunted House EP. At Purple Party last weekend, I could have sworn I heard DJ Paulo drop this track during his closing party set. While it might not have been, it easily would have fit in the set.